Avatar
Please consider registering
Guest
Search
Forum Scope


Match



Forum Options



Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters
Register Lost password?
sp_TopicIcon
Not so current, but oh so cool
Avatar
brucertx
North TX

Supporter

Range Officer

Dans Club


Range Officers

Members
Forum Posts: 2311
Member Since:
July 2, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
1
October 18, 2016 - 4:53 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

To the paranoid people who check behind shower curtains for murderers:

if you find one...what's your plan?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Avatar
Stinger
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2600
Member Since:
February 16, 2016
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
2
October 18, 2016 - 5:46 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

brucertx said
D-DAY: Normandy 70th anniversary – by Drone

  

That was cool, thanks for sharing.

Avatar
photohause
Sebastian, FL
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2218
Member Since:
February 20, 2008
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
3
October 19, 2016 - 10:02 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Terrific-thanks for posting this.

 

In 1980 I toured Europe with my Dad, and stood on many battle fields with him which he fought on. Not easy to comprehend then….lots of information and emotions to process. I cannot begin to tell you folks how many local people throughout the different nations embraced my father when they found out he fought and helped to liberate them. He befriended many people and stayed in contact with them for many, many years.

 

George

 If you're going to drink, don't drive. Don't even putt. 

Avatar
Steve
Member

Dans Club
Forum Posts: 10330
Member Since:
March 2, 2008
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
4
October 19, 2016 - 7:13 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

I went to a bookstore and asked the saleswoman "Were is the Self Help Section?" She said if she told me, it would defeat the purpose.

George Carlin

Avatar
Charger Fan
Northern Utah

Supporter
Members


Moderators
Forum Posts: 10563
Member Since:
January 24, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
5
October 21, 2016 - 10:33 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Wow, that was really cool, thanks for posting that, Bruce!

Two things…I had no idea there were any intact gun batteries there, much less ones that appear so well preserved, and…dang, when it’s low tide, nobody is going anywhere fast!lol2

I need to get out more & see special places like this.

Be yourself, everyone else is already taken.

Avatar
photohause
Sebastian, FL
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2218
Member Since:
February 20, 2008
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
6
October 24, 2016 - 4:09 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Enlisted at age 19, just a kid from NYC. Patton’s 3rd army, Sixth Armored. 

On July 18, 1944, the 6th Armored Division landed on the Normandy beaches, some six weeks after the D-Day invasion of western Europe. The “Super Sixth” was subsequently assigned to General George S. Patton’s Third Army, and took part in the Allied counteroffensive to stop the German advance during the Battle of the Bulge. At the end of March 1945, the unit crossed the Rhine River and moved quickly into central Germany. 

After fording the Werra River and advancing deeper into the German state of Thuringia, the 6th Armored Division overran the Buchenwald concentration camp on April 11, 1945. When the US troops arrived, the SS guards had fled and the prisoners had taken control of the camp. Several inmates had left the camp in the interim in order to contact the US troops in the vicinity. They approached members of the 6th Armored Division with information about the camp. The first US troops arrived in Buchenwald shortly thereafter, to be greeted by the cheers of the liberated prisoners. The “Super Sixth” reported that some 21,000 inmates were still in the camp. In the days preceding the camp’s liberation, the SS had evacuated thousands of inmates on death marches.

Dad carried a camera and took photos of the camp…oh boy..lasting impression in my mode as a youngster.

We stood together in Bastonge, toured the battle field for two days. When we entered the outskirts of the town, he said to me, “the last time I was here, the cathedral was the only building standing.” He told me it was so cold that guys were urinating on their rifle actions to unfreeze them. Army issued them condoms to keep them from getting VD and such. They used them to put over the ends of their riffle barrels to keep the rain out and freezing.

From there they went to Metz where the borders of France, Germany, and Luxembourg meet. Metz were sympathetic towards the Germans. One, or several of the men in the unit were invited into a home by a civilian to eat, where a woman picked up a M1 and shot the owner of the gun.…no more visits. When we drove near Metz, he told me this and we skirted the area. Recaptured several areas. Liberated others. Pushed the enemy into Germany. 

Altogether, England, France, Luxembourg, Belgium where he was always greeted with handshakes, kisses and hugs from the locals. 

He received two Purple Hearts, one Silver Star, two Bronze Stars (known as oak leaf cluster) and the French Croix de Guerre (feats of bravery), all for valor. Only once when I was a lad did I ask him how he was awarded them…he said he would tell me at another time. He never did, and I never asked again.

He gave me my first gun at age four, a single shot .22LR.

Sorry if is too much information. I was very proud of him.

 If you're going to drink, don't drive. Don't even putt. 

Avatar
Stinger
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2600
Member Since:
February 16, 2016
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
7
October 24, 2016 - 4:38 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

photohause said
Enlisted at age 19, just a kid from NYC. Patton’s 3rd army, Sixth Armored.  He received two Purple Hearts, one Silver Star, two Bronze Stars (known as oak leaf cluster) and the French Croix de Guerre (feats of bravery), all for valor.

Exalt !!!

Avatar
rwsem
SOWELA (Southwest Louisiana)

Supporter
Members


Moderators


Dans Club
Forum Posts: 4794
Member Since:
February 22, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
8
October 24, 2016 - 5:29 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Technically, the glass is always full; half liquid, half air....

Avatar
bikeridertim
Concord NC 28025

Supporter
Members


DWF Supporters
Forum Posts: 310
Member Since:
February 16, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
9
October 24, 2016 - 5:53 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

3efb0b6e-b7be-477f-9e74-396eb4b5917e_zpse6db0b24.JPG

"If guns cause crime, all of mine are defective." 

Avatar
brucertx
North TX

Supporter

Range Officer

Dans Club


Range Officers

Members
Forum Posts: 2311
Member Since:
July 2, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
10
October 24, 2016 - 10:11 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

To the paranoid people who check behind shower curtains for murderers:

if you find one...what's your plan?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Avatar
photohause
Sebastian, FL
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2218
Member Since:
February 20, 2008
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
11
October 25, 2016 - 9:50 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

You gents have good taste. Thank you for taking the time to read this, and, the presence of mind to appreciate what I have written. I have not shared this with many others. Extra dessert for all tonight!

 

George

 If you're going to drink, don't drive. Don't even putt. 

Avatar
Albert83
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 100
Member Since:
May 16, 2012
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
12
October 25, 2016 - 12:25 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print
Avatar
Charger Fan
Northern Utah

Supporter
Members


Moderators
Forum Posts: 10563
Member Since:
January 24, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
13
October 30, 2016 - 4:02 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

I apologize for my tardiness, thank you so much for taking the time to share your father’s experiences with us George! I truly enjoy stories like this.

Be yourself, everyone else is already taken.

Avatar
SCORPIO
PA

Supporter

Range Officer
Members


Moderators


DWF Supporters


Dans Club
Forum Posts: 3682
Member Since:
December 4, 2011
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
14
November 1, 2016 - 10:55 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

George, thanks so much for sharing your dad’s service with us.  You have every right to be proud of your father and his accomplishments.  I enjoyed reading about his exploits and am glad you got to go back with him and see the old battle fields first hand.  I frequently talk to WWII vets who come to my place of business wearing a cap with WWII or a divisional insignia.  I ask them about their service and thank them.  I am always humbled when I hear the horrific things they endured and yet were able to come home and live long and productive lives in peace.    

Anything worth doing is worth doing well.

My father

If a man designed it, and a man built it, then a man can fix it.

My grandfather

Avatar
photohause
Sebastian, FL
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2218
Member Since:
February 20, 2008
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
15
November 3, 2016 - 3:28 pm
sp_Permalink sp_Print

I know what you mean. I stopped a gent in the store with a WWII cap on ash asked him what theater he served…he told me in the Aleutians. HOLY CRAP. I said “fighting the Japanese?”  “Yes sir.” I asked him low long, he stated…” Until we kicked all of their asses…Two Years!” Great reply for somebody 92 years young…LOL.

 If you're going to drink, don't drive. Don't even putt. 

Avatar
Zedbra
Squamish, British Columbia
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 493
Member Since:
January 17, 2015
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
16
November 4, 2016 - 8:43 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print sp_EditHistory

Thanks for sharing, George.  I loved hearing stories from both my grandparents about WWII.  One was in the Royal Merchant Navy out of Ireland and the other was a bomber pilot with the Royal Canadian Air Force.

This was my grandfather, a bomber pilot during WWII.  He watched his brother-in-law get shot down, as they flew in the same squadron.  He spoke little about the war, but did say he did not agree with the incendiary bomb raids and also that if he was asked to serve again, he would proudly do it in a heartbeat.  He started his 1st mission on D-Day.

http://i459.photobucket.com/albums/qq314/Zedbra/MIsc/GrandpaLehtiService_zpsa0b7bdec.jpgImage Enlarger

The Airforce Association of Canada has some nice bios if you are looking for family members’ information.  I like how they commented about my grandpas calm demeanor – which he had to the day he died. 

LEHTI, F/O Henry Walderman (J23735) – Distinguished Flying Cross – No.166 Squadron – Award effective 1 December 1944 as per London Gazette dated 8 December 1944 and AFRO 337/45 dated 23 February 1945. Born 13 August 1912 in Coleman, Alberta of Finnish parents (he spoke the language). Educated in Coleman (1918-1919), Langley Public School in British Columbia (1919-1921), Prairie Public School, Nanimo (1921-25), Nanaimo High School (1925-1928) and Normal Business School (1928-1929). Employed by Royal Bank, Nanaimo as cllerk and ledger keeper, 1929-1931; commercial fisherman in Gulf of Georgia, owning his own boat (1931-1935) and a rigger with Lake Logging, Rounds, British Columbia, 1936-1941. He gave his home as Nanaimo, British Columbia. Enlisted Vancouver, 23 January 1942. To No.3 Manning Depot, Edmonton, 9 March 1942. To No.4 ITS, Edmonton, 7 June 1942; training interrupted for surgery; graduated and promoted LAC, 9 October 1942; to No.2 BGS, Mossbank, 25 October 1942; graduated 23 December 1942 and posted on 27 December 1942 to No.5 AOS, Winnipeg; graduated and commissioned 12 February 1943. To Mountain View, 21 February 1943. To No.8 BGS, Lethbridge, to instruct, 9 March 1943. To Y Depot, Halifax, 3 August 1943. Promoted Flying Officer, 12 August 1943. Embarked from Halifax, 26 August 1943. Disembarked in Britain, 1 September 1943. To No.3 PRC, Bournemouth, 2 September 1943. To No.2 (Observer) AFU, 2 November 1943. To No.81 OTU, 21 December 1943. To No.30 OTU, 31 December 1943. To No.11 Base, 31 March 1944. To No.166 Squadron, 10 May 1944. To No.1656 Conversion Unit, 13 September 1944. Attached to No.1 AA School, Manby, 14 October to 11 November 1944. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 12 February 1945. Repatriated via Greenwood, 31 July 1945. Retired 4 October 1945. Died in Kamloops, British Columbia, 7 June 1984 as per British Columbia Vital Statistics. Presented with DFC, 6 May 1950. No citation other than \”..in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy.\” Public Records Office Air 2/8882 has recommendation dated 5 September 1944 when he had flown 30 sorties (168 hours), 6 June to 29 August 1944.

6 June 1944 – Acheres
7 June 1944 – Versailles
10 June 1944 – Acheres
13 June 1944 – Gelsenkirchen
14 June 1944 – Le Havre
16 June 1944 – Sterkrade Holten
22 June 1944 – Mimoyecques
23 June 1944 – Saintes
24 June 1944 – Flers
27 June 1944 – Chateau Bernapre
29 June 1944 – Domleger
30 June 1944 – Oisemont
1 July 1944 – Domleger
4 July 1944 – Orlean
5 July 1944 – Dijon
7 July 1944 – Caen
20 July 1944 – Wizernes
24 July 1944 – Stuttgart
25 July 1944 – Stuttgart
30 July 1944 – Cahagnes
2 August 1944 – Le Havre
4 August 1944 – Pauillac
7 August 1944 – Fontenay le Marmion
11 August 1944 – Duvai
12 August 1944 – Brunswick
14 August 1944 – GARDENING
16 August 1944 – GARDENING
25 August 1944 – Russelsheim
26 August 1944 – GARDENING
29 August 1944 – Stettin

This Canadian Air Bomber, in his 30 sorties on targets in Germany and occupied territory, has consistently displayed courage of a high order and is outstanding in his determination to inflict the greatest damage possible on the target given to him. He has a great sense of crew discipline and has shown himself to be a very gallant member of a good crew. Of calm and quiet disposition, he nevertheless has courage to the extreme and has shown complete disregard for his personal safety. For his unfailing sense of devotion to duty, his courage and coolness under fire, he is recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

Notes: Application for Operational Wing dated 12 September 1944 stated he had flown 30 sorties but gave start date as 18 May 1944 and end date as 31 August 1944.

On repatriation he filled out a form stating (18 July 1945) he had flown 176 hours 30 minutes on operations and 176 hours 55 minutes non-operational. Flying overseas had been on Ansons (38.40), Wellington (79.20), Halifax (21.00) and Lancaster (214.05). He had attended a Bombing Leader Course.

Training: Course at No.2 BGS was 26 October to 23 December 1942. Flew bombing training in Anson aircraft (32.40 day, 6.10 night) while gunnery flying was in Bolingbroke (4.25 day) and Battle aircraft (1.40 day). In high level bombing dropped 51 bombs by day, 18 by night; in low level bombing, dropped 22 bombs by dat, and in high level grouping dropped 18 bombs. In gunnery tests fired 600 rounds in Beam Test (nine percent hits), Beam Relative Speed Test fired 600 rounds (ten percent hits) and Under Tail Test fired 600 rounds (seven percent hits). Spent six hours 55 minutes in turrets. Ground tests in bombing, written (231/250), bombing, oral (207/250), Proficiency as Bomb Aimer (264/400 – scored affected by adverse flying conditions), Gunnery, written (84/100), Gunnery, oral (81/100), Proficiency as Air Gunner (170/200), Aircraft Recognition (50/50) and Signals (48/50). Described as above average and academically an excellent student.? Also described as A leader, a worker, and a student of good calibre. Placed first in a class of 26.

Course at No.5 AOS was 28 December 1942 to 12 February 1943. Flew in Anson aircraft (18.55 day, 14.30 by night). Marked in Navigation, air work (88/100), Bombing, Air Work (61/100), Photography, air work (85/100), Elements of Navigation (46/50), Signals, practical (75/75), Photography (40/50), Reconnaissance (49/50), and Aircraft Recognition (75/75). Under ?Navigation? described as Quiet, methodical, neat. Excellent worker. By far the outstanding student in the class. Under Armament described as Excellent results in Aircraft Recognition. Bombing results should have been better. Overall he was assessed as ?Quiet. Outstanding student. Neat, keen. Recommended as an Instructor. Placed first in a class of 30.

Course for Bombing Instructors, Mountain View was 22 February to 6 March 1943. He finished fifth in a class of 15. ?Has a good knowledge of his work and showed prospects of becoming a good assistant instructor. With further experience and some assisstance he should prove satisfactory for practical work.

Course at No.2 (Observer) AFU, 2 November to 11 December 1943 was on Anson aircraft (2.45 day bombing, 14.20 day combined exercises, 21.35 night combined exercises). Dropped 12 bombs at medium level. Simulated eight day raids with photography and ten night raids with infra-red.

Course at No.30 OTU, 10 January to 19 March 1944 involved Wellington III and X aircraft (8.25 daylight local bombing, 4.40 daylight local gunnery, 10.20 daylight cross-country exercises, 12 hours five minutes other daylight flying; 9.10 night local bombing, 27.45 night cross country flying and seven hours five minutes other night flying. It was noted on 24 March 1944 under the heading of Operational Cross-Country Exercises that he had flown two such daylight exercises (one abortive, above average at map reading) and seven night exercises, but that he had not carried out a Bullseye exercise. The form listed a variety of exercises – Dual Medium Level (one exercise, eight bombs), Applied Medium Level (two exercises, 14 bombs), one Stick (two bombs), ten Simulation by Photography, two night Dual High Level Bombing (14 bombs), two night Medium Level Grouping (14 bombs), nine night Stick Exercises (18 bombs) and four Simulations by infra-red. In Gunnery he went through one Air-to-Air by day (500 rounds), one Air-to-Air, self town (200 rounds), five daylight air-to-sea (1,300 rounds), and six night air-to-sea (1,500 rounds).

Avatar
photohause
Sebastian, FL
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 2218
Member Since:
February 20, 2008
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
17
November 6, 2016 - 7:57 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

Wow, most impressive. What did he do after the war for a living?

I hadn’t realized they were using infra-red techniques at that time. 

I met a gentleman over lunch at an associating meeting last year, he had a DFC lapel pin in the jacket. He was surprised I knew what it was. I asked him how many mission he had. He told me he was a bomber pilot and did thirty-two missions.

Versailles witnessed battles over and over in WWI and then again in WWII. One can still see creators all over the place with grass grown in. The locale farmers still plow up UX ordnance. 

\
Thanks for sharing.

 If you're going to drink, don't drive. Don't even putt. 

Avatar
Zedbra
Squamish, British Columbia
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 493
Member Since:
January 17, 2015
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline
18
November 6, 2016 - 11:06 am
sp_Permalink sp_Print

He lived a quiet life after the War, working for Esso in their Vancouver HQ.  My other grandfather was an Engineer in the Royal Merchant Navy, he had some interesting stories about being torpoed twice while in the Atlantic.

Forum Timezone: America/New_York
Most Users Ever Online: 343
Currently Online: 3ric
Guest(s) 42
Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)
Top Posters:
Steve: 10330
SHOOTIST357: 4788
Dave_Ks: 4293
Supermagfan: 3166
zoommb: 3157
Blacktop: 3004
IHMSA80x80: 2781
Ole Dog: 2708
Stinger: 2600
brucertx: 2311
Newest Members:
phoebewest
RichS
igor1033
tmustang
Dan Dimmadome
Edge357
Auendave
stormrider
swf
kalashkody
Forum Stats:
Groups: 11
Forums: 42
Topics: 15142
Posts: 133157

 

Member Stats:
Guest Posters: 88
Members: 8143
Moderators: 4
Admins: 1
Administrators: Jody
Moderators: lbruce, Charger Fan, rwsem, SCORPIO